pink abalone

Pink abalone ranges from Pt. Conception, California, to Bahia de Santa Maria, Baja California Sur, Mexico (Figure 1). This species occupies sheltered waters at depths between 20 and 118 feet (6 - 36 m). The shell is thick and characterized by strong corrugations and more circular than other US abalones. There are 2 to 4 open respiratory apertures with edges that are strongly elevated above the surface of the shell. The epipodium is a “ruffle” of tissue along the side of the foot (Figure 2).

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pinto abalone

KEY INFORMATION

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White Abalone

Species Description

The white abalone is an herbivorous, marine, rocky benthic, broadcast spawning gastropod.

The shell is oval-shaped, very thin and deep. The bottom of its foot is orange, and the epipodium (a sensory structure and extension of the foot that bears tentacles) is a mottled orange tan. White abalone can grow to about 10 inches long (25 cm), but are usually 5-8 inches (13-20 cm).

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Green Abalone

Green abalone ranges from Pt. Conception, California,to Bahia Magdalena, Baja California Sur, Mexico (Figure 1). This species resides in shallow water on open/exposed coast from low intertidal to at least 30 feet (9 m) and perhaps as deep as 60 feet (18 m). They are found in rock crevices, under rocks and other cryptic cavities. The shell is usually brown and marked with many low, flat-topped ribs which run parallel to the 5 to 7 open respiratory pores that are elevated above the shell’s surface. The inside of the shell is an iridescent blue and green.

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Black Abalone

The black abalone is a large marine gastropod mollusk found in rocky intertidal and subtidal habitats. The smooth shell of the black abalone is black or slate blue on the outside with a pearly white interior. Both the mantle and foot are black. Five to nine open flush pores (respiratory pores) can be found on the left side of the shell and spiral growth lines are evident on the posterior. Tentacles surrounding the foot and extending out of the shell sense food and predators. Figure 1 shows the main anatomy.

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Bloodworms

Glyceridae is a family of polychaete worms. They are commonly referred to as beak-thrower worms or bloodworms. They are bright red, segmented, aquatic worms. The proboscis worm Glycera is sometimes called bloodworm. The Glyceridae are ferocious epi- and infaunal polychaetes that prey upon small invertebrates. They are errant burrowers that build galleries of interconnected tubes to aid in catching their prey.

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Beak-Thrower Worms

Glyceridae is a family of polychaete worms. They are commonly referred to as beak-thrower worms or bloodworms. They are bright red, segmented, aquatic worms. The proboscis worm Glycera is sometimes called bloodworm. The Glyceridae are ferocious epi- and infaunal polychaetes that prey upon small invertebrates. They are errant burrowers that build galleries of interconnected tubes to aid in catching their prey.

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Glyceridae

Glyceridae is a family of polychaete worms. They are commonly referred to as beak-thrower worms or bloodworms. They are bright red, segmented, aquatic worms. The proboscis worm Glycera is sometimes called bloodworm. The Glyceridae are ferocious epi- and infaunal polychaetes that prey upon small invertebrates. They are errant burrowers that build galleries of interconnected tubes to aid in catching their prey.

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Hesionidae

Hesionidae are a family of phyllodocid bristle worms (class Polychaeta). They are (like almost all polychaetes) marine organisms. Most are found on the continental shelf; Hesiocaeca methanicola[verification needed] is found on methane ice, where it feeds on bacterial biofilms.

A characteristic apomorphy of the Hesionidae are the cirrophores of the anterior segments, which are well-developed cup-like sheaths; the cirri of the subsequent segments insert into the parapodia directly, or with just a vestigial cirrophore.

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Catworms

Nephtyidae is a taxonomic family of worms. They are commonly referred to as catworms.

Nephtyidae are pale, clearly segmented polychaetes with a small pentagonal prostomium with two pairs of small antennae. There segments are little differentiated and have a rectangular cross-section.

Nephtyids are active predators, with a strong muscular proboscis, armed with two well developed jaws.

They can dig relatively fast through sandy sediments. They can also swim with sinuous movements.

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